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Today's Highlights
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Today's news headlines from the sources selected by our team:

No Record, But Arctic Sea Ice Will be Among 10 Lowest
Arctic sea ice extent won't reach a record low this year, but it is still declining and could place in the top
LiveScience.com, Thu, 31 Jul 2014 19:01:49 GMT

Surf's Up in the Arctic: Record-High Waves Seen in 2012
Record-high waves hit the Beaufort Sea, north of Alaska, in September 2012, when Arctic sea ice shrank to an extreme summer low.
LiveScience.com, Thu, 31 Jul 2014 19:01:49 GMT

New Biomaterial Mimics Functionality of Natural Cartilage
Two teams, working years apart, merged their creations to develop a framework used to grow replacement cartilage — a 3-D fabric scaffold, integrated with a pliable hydrogel and then infiltrated with stem cells.
LiveScience.com, Thu, 31 Jul 2014 19:01:49 GMT

Innovative 'genotype first' approach uncovers protective factor for heart disease
Extensive sequencing of DNA from thousands of individuals in Finland has unearthed scores of mutations that destroy gene function and are found at unusually high frequencies. Among these are two mutations in a gene called LPA that may reduce a person's risk of heart disease. These findings are an exciting proof-of-concept for a new "genotype first" approach to identifying rare genetic variants associated with, or protecting from, disease followed by extensive medical review of carriers. The new study by researchers from the Broad Institute, Massachusetts General Hospital (MGH), the University of Helsinki, and an international team of collaborators appears in a paper published online July 31 in PLOS Genetics.
Medical Xpress - spotlight medical and health news stories, Thu, 31 Jul 2014 19:01:49 GMT

Childhood coxsackie virus infection depletes cardiac stem cells and might compromise heart health in adults
There is epidemiological evidence that links type B coxsackie virus (CVB) infection with heart disease, and research published on July 31st in PLOS Pathogens now suggests a mechanism by which early infection impairs the heart's ability to tolerate stress at later stages of life.
Medical Xpress - spotlight medical and health news stories, Thu, 31 Jul 2014 19:01:49 GMT

New paper describes how DNA avoids damage from UV light
In the same week that the U.S. surgeon general issued a 101-page report about the dangers of skin cancer, researchers at Montana State University published a paper breaking new ground on how DNA – the genetic code in every cell – responds when exposed to ultraviolet (UV) light.
Medical Xpress - spotlight medical and health news stories, Thu, 31 Jul 2014 19:01:49 GMT

Goalkeepers' penalty 'flaw' revealed
Goalkeepers in penalty shoot-outs make a predictable error that could influence the outcome of the game according to new research.
BBC News - Science & Environment, Thu, 31 Jul 2014 19:01:50 GMT

Dinosaurs 'shrank' to become birds
Huge meat-eating, land-living dinosaurs evolved into birds by constantly shrinking for over 50 million years, new research shows.
BBC News - Science & Environment, Thu, 31 Jul 2014 19:01:50 GMT

Minister wants end to animal testing
Norman Baker - the minister in charge of regulating animal experiments - tells the BBC he wants them to end.
BBC News - Science & Environment, Thu, 31 Jul 2014 19:01:50 GMT

Lead in teeth can tell a body's tale, study finds
Your teeth can tell stories about you, and not just that you always forget to floss. The discovery could help police solve cold cases, an investigator has said. For instance, if an unidentified decomposed body is found, testing the lead in the teeth could immediately help focus the investigation on a certain geographic area. That way, law enforcement can avoid wasting resources checking for missing persons in the wrong places.
Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily, Thu, 31 Jul 2014 19:01:50 GMT

Hubble shows farthest lensing galaxy yields clues to early universe
Astronomers have unexpectedly discovered the most distant galaxy that acts as a cosmic magnifying glass. Seen in a new image as it looked 9.6 billion years ago, this monster elliptical galaxy breaks the previous record holder by 200 million years.
Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily, Thu, 31 Jul 2014 19:01:50 GMT

Pervasive implicit hierarchies for race, religion, age revealed by study
As much as social equality is advocated in the United States, a new study suggests that besides evaluating their own race and religion most favorably, people share implicit hierarchies for racial, religious, and age groups that may be different from their conscious, explicit attitudes and values.
Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily, Thu, 31 Jul 2014 19:01:50 GMT

Particles can be physically separated from own properties, scientists say
Physicists explore yet another strange consequence of the laws of quantum mechanics.
World Science, Thu, 31 Jul 2014 19:01:52 GMT

Study: fist-bumping more hygienic than shaking hands
shaking hands Health care providers might want to switch to the "fist-bump" gesture, researchers say
World Science, Thu, 31 Jul 2014 19:01:52 GMT

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