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Editors' Picks:



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Earth & Space News
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Today's earth & space headlines from the sources selected by our team:

Water could have been abundant in first billion years after the Big Bang
How soon after the Big Bang could water have existed? Not right away, because water molecules contain oxygen and oxygen had to be formed in the first stars. Then that oxygen had to disperse and unite with hydrogen in significant amounts. New theoretical work finds that despite these complications, water vapor could have been just as abundant in pockets of space a billion years after the Big Bang as it is today.
Space & Time News -- ScienceDaily, Tue, 28 Apr 2015 19:24:22 GMT

Strange supernova is 'missing link' in gamma-ray burst connection
Astronomers find that 'central engines' in supernova explosions can come in different strengths, and include those that produce powerful blasts of gamma rays, and weaker versions that produce no such bursts.
Space & Time News -- ScienceDaily, Tue, 28 Apr 2015 19:24:22 GMT

Astrophysicists draw most comprehensive map of the universe
Astrophysicists have created a 3-D map of the universe that spans nearly two billion light years and is the most complete picture of our cosmic neighborhood to date.
Space & Time News -- ScienceDaily, Tue, 28 Apr 2015 19:24:22 GMT

Flashback! Russian Cargo Ship Re-Entry Captured By ISS Crew | Video
In October 2011, the Progress 42P spacecraft was undocked from the International Space Station and destroyed in a fiery atmospheric re-entry. It safely burned up over the Pacific Ocean.
SPACE.com, Tue, 28 Apr 2015 19:24:23 GMT

Senate Confirms Dava Newman as NASA Deputy Administrator
The Senate voted unanimously April 27 to confirm Dava Newman as NASA's deputy administrator, more than six months after she was nominated.
SPACE.com, Tue, 28 Apr 2015 19:24:23 GMT

MESSENGER Is Dead, Long Live Its Mercury Imagery | Video
Relive 7 glorious years of exploration with this animation/actual imagery retrospective. Completely drained of fuel, the probe will slam into Mercury's surface at over 8,750 miles per hour producing a crater about 50ft (16m) in diameter.
SPACE.com, Tue, 28 Apr 2015 19:24:23 GMT

Strong evidence for coronal heating theory presented
The Sun's surface is blisteringly hot at 6,000 kelvins or 10,340 degrees Fahrenheit—but its atmosphere is another 300 times hotter. This has led to an enduring mystery for those who study the Sun: What heats the atmosphere to such extreme temperatures? Normally when you move away from a hot source the environment gets cooler, but some mechanism is clearly at work in the solar atmosphere, the corona, to bring the temperatures up so high.
Phys.org: Astronomy & Space News, Tue, 28 Apr 2015 19:24:23 GMT

Water could have been abundant in the first billion years
How soon after the Big Bang could water have existed? Not right away, because water molecules contain oxygen and oxygen had to be formed in the first stars. Then that oxygen had to disperse and unite with hydrogen in significant amounts. New theoretical work finds that despite these complications, water vapor could have been just as abundant in pockets of space a billion years after the Big Bang as it is today.
Phys.org: Astronomy & Space News, Tue, 28 Apr 2015 19:24:23 GMT

The view from up there, down here
When many people saw the first stunning photos of the fragile blue marble of Earth from space, it changed their outlook of humanity. It was a singular moment in time when people around the world were watching and looking toward the future as NASA began to turn small steps into giant leaps.
Phys.org: Astronomy & Space News, Tue, 28 Apr 2015 19:24:23 GMT

Galaxy-gazing telescope sensors pass important vision tests
When you're building a massive telescope designed to detect subtle shapes in the light emitted by distant galaxies, you'd like to know that the shapes you are seeing are accurate and not the result of defects in your telescope's sensors. Fortunately sensors for the camera of the Large Synoptic Survey Telescope (LSST), expected to see "first light" from atop a mountain in Chile in 2020, just received very promising "vision" test results from physicists at the U.S. Department of Energy's Brookhaven National Laboratory. 
Phys.org: Astronomy & Space News, Tue, 28 Apr 2015 19:24:23 GMT

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SciCentral picks

The top 5 resources
selected by our team
for earth & space
news coverage:


SpaceRef.com
rank:1
white line spacer SpaceFlight Now
rank:2
white line spacer Space Daily
rank:3
white line spacer Space.com
rank:4
white line spacer Universe Today
rank:5
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