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Bioscience News
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Today's biological science headlines from the sources selected by our team:

Modified experimental vaccine protects monkeys from deadly malaria
Researchers have modified an experimental malaria vaccine and showed that it completely protected four of eight monkeys that received it against challenge with the virulent Plasmodium falciparum malaria parasite. In three of the remaining four monkeys, the vaccine delayed when parasites first appeared in the blood by more than 25 days.
Plants & Animals News -- ScienceDaily, Thu, 25 May 2017 10:00:58 GMT

Triple play boosting value of renewable fuel could tip market in favor of biomass
A new process triples the fraction of biomass converted to high-value products to nearly 80 percent, also tripling the expected rate of return for an investment in the technology from roughly 10 percent (for one end product) to 30 percent.
Plants & Animals News -- ScienceDaily, Thu, 25 May 2017 10:00:58 GMT

Insects resist genetic methods to control disease spread, study finds
Insects possess a naturally occurring resistance to the use of gene-editing technology to prevent diseases such as malaria, new research shows.
Plants & Animals News -- ScienceDaily, Thu, 25 May 2017 10:00:58 GMT

Designer worm spit supercharges healing
(James Cook University) Every day 12 Australian diabetics have a limb amputated because of a non-healing wound. Globally, it's one every 30 seconds. A molecule produced by a Thai liver parasite could be the solution to those non-healing wounds -- and scientists from the Australian Institute of Tropical Health and Medicine are now able to produce a version of the molecule on a large enough scale to make it available for laboratory tests and eventually clinical trials.
EurekAlert! - Biology, Thu, 25 May 2017 10:00:58 GMT

New drug therapy could improve brain function and life expectancy of ALS patients
(American Associates, Ben-Gurion University of the Negev) The Ben-Gurion U. researcher successfully redesigned a portion of MabThera, an FDA-approved drug used to treat certain autoimmune diseases and types of cancer, into a new molecule to treat ALS. 'Our experimental results on ALS transgenic mice showed a significant increase in life expectancy,' says Dr. Lichtenstein. 'Since the drug is already approved, we believe that we will only need limited preclinical testing to reach the clinical phase earlier than other initiatives.'
EurekAlert! - Biology, Thu, 25 May 2017 10:00:58 GMT

University of Montana student earns NASA Earth and Space science fellowship
(The University of Montana) University of Montana doctoral candidate Eric Palm recently was selected for the prestigious NASA Earth and Space Science Fellowship. He is the only Montana University System student to receive the competitive funding this year.
EurekAlert! - Biology, Thu, 25 May 2017 10:00:58 GMT

The proteins that domesticated our genomes

EPFL scientists have carried out a genomic and evolutionary study of a large and enigmatic family of human proteins, to demonstrate that it is responsible for harnessing the millions of transposable elements in the human genome. The work reveals the largely species-specific gene-regulatory networks that impact all of human biology, in both health and disease.

Biology News Net, Thu, 25 May 2017 10:00:58 GMT

Human kidney progenitors isolated, offering new clues to cell renewal

In a first-of-its-kind look at human kidney development, researchers at The Saban Research Institute of Children's Hospital Los Angeles have isolated human nephron progenitor (NP) cells. Their results, published online in the journal Stem Cell Translational Medicine, will help scientists understand how these progenitor cells become renal cells in the developing fetus, and possibly offer a future way to foster renal regeneration after chronic kidney failure or acute injury.

Biology News Net, Thu, 25 May 2017 10:00:58 GMT

Study reveals how ionising radiation damages DNA and causes cancer

For the first time, researchers from the Wellcome Trust Sanger Institute and their collaborators have been able to identify in human cancers two characteristic patterns of DNA damage caused by ionising radiation. These fingerprint patterns may now enable doctors to identify which tumours have been caused by radiation, and investigate if they should be treated differently.

Biology News Net, Thu, 25 May 2017 10:00:58 GMT

International collaboration working to enhance protections for spinner dolphins
An international study involving researchers from Western Australia and the United States has unlocked a key behavioural schedule in spinner dolphins, which could provide crucial insight to conservation measures for the free-ranging animals.
Biology News - Evolution, Cell theory, Gene theory, Microbiology, Biotechnology, Fri, 13 Jan 2017 14:48:20 GMT

Video: Tracking data and shark behaviour
Animals often share space as they move through their environment. Capturing these aggregations and co-occurrence events has proven extremely difficult in elusive, wide-ranging animals.
Biology News - Evolution, Cell theory, Gene theory, Microbiology, Biotechnology, Fri, 13 Jan 2017 14:48:20 GMT

Tremors in newborn piglets attributed to previously unidentified virus
Symptoms of tremors and shaking in newborn piglets are not a sign that the animals are cold, but rather that they are suffering from a specific viral infection. Researchers at Vetmeduni Vienna have now been able to prove this correlation for the first time using a newly developed test. The scientists detected a previously unknown virus, termed atypical porcine pestivirus (APPV), in "shaking piglets", making it possible to clearly diagnose the potentially fatal disease. The virus remains in the animals for a long time following an infection and may also be transmitted sexually. The findings were published in the journal Veterinary Research.
Biology News - Evolution, Cell theory, Gene theory, Microbiology, Biotechnology, Fri, 13 Jan 2017 14:48:20 GMT

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SciCentral picks

The top 5 resources
selected by our team
for biological science
news coverage:


EurekAlert!
rank:1
white line spacer BiologyNewsNet
rank:2
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Science Daily
rank:3
white line spacer The Scientist
rank:4
white line spacer BioSpace
rank:5
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