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Bioscience News
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Today's biological science headlines from the sources selected by our team:

Molecular beacons shine light on how cells 'crawl'
Chemists have devised a method using DNA-based tension probes to zoom in at the molecular level and measure and map how cells mechanically sense their environments, migrate and adhere to things.
Plants & Animals News -- ScienceDaily, Sat, 25 Oct 2014 16:06:55 GMT

Decrease of genetic diversity in the endangered Saimaa ringed seal continues
The critically endangered Saimaa ringed seal, which inhabits Lake Saimaa in Finland, has extremely low genetic diversity and this development seems to continue, according to a recent study. Researchers analyzed the temporal and regional variation in the genetic diversity of the endangered Saimaa ringed seal. The population is only around 300 individuals divided into smaller sub-populations and with very little migration among between them.
Plants & Animals News -- ScienceDaily, Sat, 25 Oct 2014 16:06:55 GMT

Ebola's evolutionary roots more ancient than previously thought
A new study is helping to rewrite Ebola’s family history. It shows that Ebola and Marburg are each members of ancient evolutionary lines, and that these two viruses last shared a common ancestor sometime prior to 16-23 million years ago.
Plants & Animals News -- ScienceDaily, Sat, 25 Oct 2014 16:06:55 GMT

UTSW assistant professor chosen for $1.5 million Data-Driven Discovery award from Gordon
(UT Southwestern Medical Center) Dr. Kimberly Reynolds, Assistant Professor in the Cecil H. and Ida Green Comprehensive Center for Molecular, Computational, and Systems Biology and in the Department of Biophysics at University of Texas Southwestern Medical Center, has been named one of 14 Moore Investigators in Data-Driven Discovery.
EurekAlert! - Biology, Sat, 25 Oct 2014 16:06:55 GMT

NJIT hosts the NJ mayors' Summit on Resilient Design
(New Jersey Institute of Technology) Local mayors and state and federal experts will gather at New Jersey Institute of Technology to discuss how the state has recovered from two of the worst natural disasters ever to hit New Jersey: Hurricanes Sandy and Irene.
EurekAlert! - Biology, Sat, 25 Oct 2014 16:06:55 GMT

Some like it loud
(National Evolutionary Synthesis Center (NESCent)) Species of poison frogs that utilize bright warning coloration as protection from predators are more likely to develop louder, more complex calls than relatives that rely on camouflage. New research indicates that because these visual cues establish certain species as unsavory prey, they are free to make noisy calls in plain sight and better attract possible mates.
EurekAlert! - Biology, Sat, 25 Oct 2014 16:06:55 GMT

Molecular beacons shine light on how cells 'crawl'


'Our premise is that mechanics play a role in almost all biological processes, and with these DNA-based tension probes we're going to uncover, measure and map those forces,' says biomolecular...
Adherent cells, the kind that form the architecture of all multi-cellular organisms, are mechanically engineered with precise forces that allow them to move around and stick to things. Proteins called integrin receptors act like little hands and feet to pull these cells across a surface or to anchor them in place. When groups of these cells are put into a petri dish with a variety of substrates they can sense the differences in the surfaces and they will "crawl" toward the stiffest one they can find.

Biology News Net, Sat, 25 Oct 2014 16:06:55 GMT

Scientists engineer toxin-secreting stem cells to treat brain tumors


Encapsulated toxin-producing stem cells (in blue) help kill brain tumor cells in the tumor resection cavity (in green).
Harvard Stem Cell Institute scientists at Massachusetts General Hospital have devised a new way to use stem cells in the fight against brain cancer. A team led by neuroscientist Khalid Shah, MS, PhD, who recently demonstrated the value of stem cells loaded with cancer-killing herpes viruses, now has a way to genetically engineer stem cells so that they can produce and secrete tumor-killing toxins.

Biology News Net, Sat, 25 Oct 2014 16:06:55 GMT

A new dent in HIV-1's armor


This image shows, from the left: Katherine Jones, Salk professor, and first authors Yupeng Chen and Lirong Zhang.
Like a slumbering dragon, HIV can lay dormant in a person's cells for years, evading medical treatments only to wake up and strike at a later time, quickly replicating itself and destroying the immune system.

Biology News Net, Sat, 25 Oct 2014 16:06:55 GMT

Warning coloration paved the way for louder, more complex calls in certain species of poisonous frogs
Frogs are well-known for being among the loudest amphibians, but new research indicates that the development of this trait followed another: bright coloration. Scientists have found that the telltale colors of some poisonous frog species established them as an unappetizing option for would-be predators before the frogs evolved their elaborate songs. As a result, these initial warning signals allowed different species to diversify their calls over time.
Phys.org: Biology News, Sat, 25 Oct 2014 16:06:56 GMT

Law of the Sea authorizes animal tagging research without nations' consent
Many marine animals are world travelers, and scientists who study and track them can rarely predict through which nations' territorial waters their paths will lead.
Phys.org: Biology News, Sat, 25 Oct 2014 16:06:56 GMT

Climate change impacts countered by stricter fisheries management
A new study has found that implementing stricter fisheries management overcame the expected detrimental effects of climate change disturbances in coral reef fisheries badly impacted by the 1997/98 El Niño, according to the Wildlife Conservation Society.
Phys.org: Biology News, Sat, 25 Oct 2014 16:06:56 GMT

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SciCentral picks

The top 5 resources
selected by our team
for biological science
news coverage:


EurekAlert!
rank:1
white line spacer BiologyNewsNet
rank:2
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Science Daily
rank:3
white line spacer The Scientist
rank:4
white line spacer BioSpace
rank:5
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