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Bioscience News
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Today's biological science headlines from the sources selected by our team:

Global threat to primates concerns us all
In cooperation with an international team of experts, scientists demand immediate measures to protect primates.
Plants & Animals News -- ScienceDaily, Wed, 18 Jan 2017 22:41:19 GMT

International effort announced to try to save the world's most endangered marine mammal
An ambitious, emergency plan to help save the vaquita porpoise from extinction in the northern Gulf of California has been recommended by the International Committee for the Recovery of the Vaquita (CIRVA). The plan involves relocating some of the remaining vaquitas to a temporary sanctuary, while crucial efforts aimed at eliminating illegal fishing and removing gillnets from their environment continue.
Plants & Animals News -- ScienceDaily, Wed, 18 Jan 2017 22:41:19 GMT

Massive sea lion, fur seal hunting in the Patagonian coasts is altering Southern Atlantic Ocean ecosystems
Sea lion hunting by the Europeans at the Atlantic coasts of South America – it started in the 19th Century and continued up to the second half of the 20th century in Argentina and Uruguay – changed its nutrition guidelines of these pinnipeds as well as the structure of the coastal trophic network, according to new research.
Plants & Animals News -- ScienceDaily, Wed, 18 Jan 2017 22:41:19 GMT

Mapping the mind of worms
(University of Miami) Dr. Kevin Collins carefully places a petri dish with what looks like a blotch of yellowish slime under a microscope. Magnified, the slime comes alive as hundreds of translucent worms, known as Caenorhabditis elegans, slither to and fro.
EurekAlert! - Biology, Wed, 18 Jan 2017 22:41:19 GMT

Actress Kathy Bates to be honored at Research!America's Advocacy Awards Dinner
(Research!America) Kathy Bates, award-winning actress and Lymphatic Education & Research Network (LE&RN) spokesperson, will receive Research!America's Isadore Rosenfeld Award for Impact on Public Opinion for raising the visibility of lymphedema and lymphatic diseases and advocating tirelessly on behalf of the patient community. The Rosenfeld Award is presented to individuals who have worked to effectively deliver medical or other health-related research advocacy messages to the public.
EurekAlert! - Biology, Wed, 18 Jan 2017 22:41:19 GMT

How estrogen modulates fear learning
(Emory Health Sciences) Low estrogen levels may make women more susceptible to the development of post-traumatic stress disorder (PTSD), while high estrogen levels may be protective. New research provides insight into how estrogen changes gene activity in the brain to achieve its protective effects.
EurekAlert! - Biology, Wed, 18 Jan 2017 22:41:19 GMT

Human kidney progenitors isolated, offering new clues to cell renewal

In a first-of-its-kind look at human kidney development, researchers at The Saban Research Institute of Children's Hospital Los Angeles have isolated human nephron progenitor (NP) cells. Their results, published online in the journal Stem Cell Translational Medicine, will help scientists understand how these progenitor cells become renal cells in the developing fetus, and possibly offer a future way to foster renal regeneration after chronic kidney failure or acute injury.

Biology News Net, Wed, 18 Jan 2017 22:41:20 GMT

Study reveals how ionising radiation damages DNA and causes cancer

For the first time, researchers from the Wellcome Trust Sanger Institute and their collaborators have been able to identify in human cancers two characteristic patterns of DNA damage caused by ionising radiation. These fingerprint patterns may now enable doctors to identify which tumours have been caused by radiation, and investigate if they should be treated differently.

Biology News Net, Wed, 18 Jan 2017 22:41:20 GMT

Giraffes more speciose than expected

Scientists from the Senckenberg and the Giraffe Conservation Foundation have analysed the genetic relationships of all major populations of giraffe in the wild. The large study on the genetic makeup of giraffe, published today in Current Biology, shows that there are four distinct giraffe species. Until now, only one giraffe species had been recognized. The unexpected results are based on analyses using several nuclear marker genes of more than 100 animals. The new insights are set to improve protection efforts of these endangered animals in Africa.

Biology News Net, Wed, 18 Jan 2017 22:41:20 GMT

International collaboration working to enhance protections for spinner dolphins
An international study involving researchers from Western Australia and the United States has unlocked a key behavioural schedule in spinner dolphins, which could provide crucial insight to conservation measures for the free-ranging animals.
Biology News - Evolution, Cell theory, Gene theory, Microbiology, Biotechnology, Fri, 13 Jan 2017 14:48:20 GMT

Video: Tracking data and shark behaviour
Animals often share space as they move through their environment. Capturing these aggregations and co-occurrence events has proven extremely difficult in elusive, wide-ranging animals.
Biology News - Evolution, Cell theory, Gene theory, Microbiology, Biotechnology, Fri, 13 Jan 2017 14:48:20 GMT

Tremors in newborn piglets attributed to previously unidentified virus
Symptoms of tremors and shaking in newborn piglets are not a sign that the animals are cold, but rather that they are suffering from a specific viral infection. Researchers at Vetmeduni Vienna have now been able to prove this correlation for the first time using a newly developed test. The scientists detected a previously unknown virus, termed atypical porcine pestivirus (APPV), in "shaking piglets", making it possible to clearly diagnose the potentially fatal disease. The virus remains in the animals for a long time following an infection and may also be transmitted sexually. The findings were published in the journal Veterinary Research.
Biology News - Evolution, Cell theory, Gene theory, Microbiology, Biotechnology, Fri, 13 Jan 2017 14:48:20 GMT

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SciCentral picks

The top 5 resources
selected by our team
for biological science
news coverage:


EurekAlert!
rank:1
white line spacer BiologyNewsNet
rank:2
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Science Daily
rank:3
white line spacer The Scientist
rank:4
white line spacer BioSpace
rank:5
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