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Editors' Picks:



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Bioscience News
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Today's biological science headlines from the sources selected by our team:

Tropical tree microbiome discovered in Panama
Despite the fact that tropical forests are the most biodiverse terrestrial ecosystems on the planet, more is known about belly-button bacteria than bacteria on trees in the tropics. Scientists working on Panama's Barro Colorado Island discovered that small leaf samples from a single tree were home to more than 400 different kinds of bacteria. The combined sample from 57 tree species contained more than 7,000 different kinds.
Plants & Animals News -- ScienceDaily, Tue, 16 Sep 2014 07:01:09 GMT

New producer of crucial vitamin B12 discovered
A single group of microorganisms may be responsible for much of the world's vitamin B12 production in the oceans, with implications for the global carbon cycle and climate change, researchers have discovered. Thaumarchaeota, they say, are likely dominant vitamin B12 producers.
Plants & Animals News -- ScienceDaily, Tue, 16 Sep 2014 07:01:09 GMT

X-rays unlock a protein's SWEET side
Understanding just how sugar makes its way into the cell could lead to the design of better drugs for diabetes patients and an increase in the amount of fruits and vegetables farmers are able to grow. Researchers have recently uncovered one of these "pathways” into the cell by piecing together proteins slightly wider than the diameter of a strand of spider silk.
Plants & Animals News -- ScienceDaily, Tue, 16 Sep 2014 07:01:09 GMT

Scientists discover RNA modifications in some unexpected places
(Whitehead Institute for Biomedical Research) Deploying sophisticated high-throughput sequencing technology, dubbed ψ-seq, a team of Whitehead Institute and Broad Institute researchers collaborated on a comprehensive, high-resolution mapping of ψ sites that confirms pseudouridylation, among the most common post-transcriptional modifications, does indeed occur naturally in mRNA.
EurekAlert! - Biology, Tue, 16 Sep 2014 07:01:09 GMT

Smithsonian scientists discover tropical tree microbiome in Panama
(Smithsonian Tropical Research Institute) Despite the fact that tropical forests are the most biodiverse terrestrial ecosystems on the planet, more is known about belly-button bacteria than bacteria on trees in the tropics. Smithsonian scientists and colleagues working on Panama's Barro Colorado Island discovered that small leaf samples from a single tree were home to more than 400 different kinds of bacteria. The combined sample from 57 tree species contained more than 7,000 different kinds.
EurekAlert! - Biology, Tue, 16 Sep 2014 07:01:09 GMT

Researcher develops and proves effectiveness of new drug for spinal muscular atrophy
(University of Missouri-Columbia) According to recent studies, approximately one out of every 40 individuals in the United States is a carrier of the gene responsible for spinal muscular atrophy (SMA), a neurodegenerative disease that causes muscles to weaken over time. Now, researchers at the University of Missouri have made a recent breakthrough with the development of a new compound found to be highly effective in animal models of the disease. In April, a patent was filed for the compound for use in SMA.
EurekAlert! - Biology, Tue, 16 Sep 2014 07:01:09 GMT

Protein secrets of Ebola virus


This is a ribbon diagram showing the tertiary structure with secondary-structure elements identified and labeled.
The current Ebola virus outbreak in West Africa, which has claimed more than 2000 lives, has highlighted the need for a deeper understanding of the molecular biology of the virus that could be critical in the development of vaccines or antiviral drugs to treat or prevent Ebola hemorrhagic fever. Now, a team at the University of Virginia (UVA), USA – under the leadership of Dr Dan Engel, a virologist, and Dr Zygmunt Derewenda, a structural biologist – has obtained the crystal structure of a key protein involved in Ebola virus replication, the C-terminal domain of the Zaire Ebola virus nucleoprotein (NP) [Dziubanska et al. (2014). Acta Cryst. D70, 2420-2429; doi:10.1107/S1399004714014710].

Biology News Net, Tue, 16 Sep 2014 07:01:09 GMT

Gut bacteria tire out T cells

Leaky intestines may cripple bacteria-fighting immune cells in patients with a rare hereditary disease, according to a study by researchers in Lausanne, Switzerland. The study, published in The Journal of Experimental Medicine on September 15, may explain why these patients suffer from recurrent bacterial infections.

Biology News Net, Tue, 16 Sep 2014 07:01:09 GMT

Researchers develop improved means of detecting mismatched DNA

Researchers at Johns Hopkins have identified a highly sensitive means of analyzing very tiny amounts of DNA. The discovery, they say, could increase the ability of forensic scientists to match genetic material in some criminal investigations. It could also prevent the need for a painful, invasive test given to transplant patients at risk of rejecting their donor organs and replace it with a blood test that reveals traces of donor DNA.

Biology News Net, Tue, 16 Sep 2014 07:01:09 GMT

Scientists discover RNA modifications in some unexpected places
The so-called central dogma of molecular biology—that DNA makes RNA which makes protein—has long provided a simplified explanation for how genetic information is deciphered and translated in living organisms.
Phys.org: Biology News, Tue, 16 Sep 2014 07:01:09 GMT

Scientists discover tropical tree microbiome in Panama
Human skin and gut microbes influence processes from digestion to disease resistance. Despite the fact that tropical forests are the most biodiverse terrestrial ecosystems on the planet, more is known about belly-button bacteria than bacteria on trees in the tropics. Smithsonian scientists and colleagues working on Panama's Barro Colorado Island discovered that small leaf samples from a single tree were home to more than 400 different kinds of bacteria. The combined sample from 57 tree species contained more than 7,000 different kinds.
Phys.org: Biology News, Tue, 16 Sep 2014 07:01:09 GMT

Collaboration drives achievement in protein structure research
When this week's print issue of the journal Science comes out, a collective cheer will go up from New Mexico, Montana and even the Netherlands, thanks to the type of collaborative effort that is more and more the norm in these connected times. Yes, the research was brilliant, and if we're lucky, it will produce innovations in biology, medicine, biotechnology and agriculture. It could save lives, and it happened because this scientist talked with that one, that one knew another one, and brilliant minds overcame geographic distance to advance human understanding.
Phys.org: Biology News, Tue, 16 Sep 2014 07:01:09 GMT

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SciCentral picks

The top 5 resources
selected by our team
for biological science
news coverage:


EurekAlert!
rank:1
white line spacer BiologyNewsNet
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Science Daily
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white line spacer The Scientist
rank:4
white line spacer BioSpace
rank:5
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