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Bioscience News
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Today's biological science headlines from the sources selected by our team:

Microbes, nitrogen and plant responses to rising atmospheric carbon dioxide
Plants can grow faster as atmospheric carbon dioxide concentrations increase, but only if they have enough nitrogen or partner with fungi that help them get it, according to new research.
Plants & Animals News -- ScienceDaily, Fri, 01 Jul 2016 07:55:00 GMT

Resistant starch may benefit people with metabolic syndrome
The secret ingredient is in the flour, but its impact lies within the gut. Adding resistant starch to the diets of people with metabolic syndrome can improve bacteria in the gut, according to research. These changes help lower bad cholesterol and decrease inflammation associated with obesity.
Plants & Animals News -- ScienceDaily, Fri, 01 Jul 2016 07:55:00 GMT

Pea plants demonstrate ability to 'gamble' -- a first in plants
Pea plants can demonstrate sensitivity to risk -- namely, that they can make adaptive choices that take into account environmental variance, an ability previously unknown outside the animal kingdom. In the study, pea plants were grown with their roots split between two pots, thus facing the decision of which pot to prioritize.
Plants & Animals News -- ScienceDaily, Fri, 01 Jul 2016 07:55:00 GMT

New anti-cancer strategy mobilizes both innate and adaptive immune response
(RIKEN) Scientists from the RIKEN Center for Integrative Medical Sciences have developed a new vaccine that involves injecting cells that have been modified so that they can stimulate both an innate immune response and the more specific adaptive response, which allows the body to keep memories and attack new tumor cells as they form.
EurekAlert! - Biology, Fri, 01 Jul 2016 07:55:00 GMT

Adélie penguin population in Antarctica threatened by climate change
(NOAA Northeast Fisheries Science Center) Climate change in Antarctica, cooling in some places and warming in others, is causing a dramatic shift in the population of Adélie penguins, according to a paper published online June 29 in Scientific Reports. Continued warming is expected to lead to population declines at approximately 30 percent of colonies by 2060 and 60 percent of colonies by 2099.
EurekAlert! - Biology, Fri, 01 Jul 2016 07:55:00 GMT

In hot water: Climate change is affecting North American fish
(US Geological Survey) Climate change is already affecting inland fish across North America -- including some fish that are popular with anglers. Scientists are seeing a variety of changes in how inland fish reproduce, grow and where they can live, according to four new studies published today in a special issue of Fisheries magazine.
EurekAlert! - Biology, Fri, 01 Jul 2016 07:55:00 GMT

Thousands on one chip: New method to study proteins


Protein microarrays like this allow the investigation of thousands of proteins in a single experiment. Microarrays are only a few centimeters in size and host thousands of individual test spots...
Since the completion of the human genome an important goal has been to elucidate the function of the now known proteins: a new molecular method enables the investigation of the function for thousands of proteins in parallel. Applying this new method, an international team of researchers with leading participation of the Technical University of Munich (TUM) was able to identify hundreds of previously unknown interactions among proteins.

Biology News Net, Fri, 01 Jul 2016 07:55:00 GMT

Gene mutation 'hotspots' linked to better breast cancer outcomes


In kataegis, multiple mutations cluster in a few hotspots in a cancer genome. Here, cytosine (C) bases are commonly substituted with thymine (T) in the DNA strand.
Kataegis is a recently discovered phenomenon in which multiple mutations cluster in a few hotspots in a genome. The anomaly was previously found in some cancers, but it has been unclear what role kataegis plays in tumor development and patient outcomes. Using a database of human tumor genomic data, researchers at the University of California San Diego School of Medicine and Moores Cancer Center have discovered that kataegis is actually a positive marker in breast cancer -- patients with these mutation hotspots have less invasive tumors and better prognoses.

Biology News Net, Fri, 01 Jul 2016 07:55:00 GMT

Pea plants demonstrate ability to 'gamble' -- a first in plants

An international team of scientists from Oxford University, UK, and Tel-Hai College, Israel, has shown that pea plants can demonstrate sensitivity to risk - namely, that they can make adaptive choices that take into account environmental variance, an ability previously unknown outside the animal kingdom.

Biology News Net, Fri, 01 Jul 2016 07:55:00 GMT

In hot water: Climate change is affecting North American fish
Climate change is already affecting inland fish across North America—including some fish that are popular with anglers. Scientists are seeing a variety of changes in how inland fish reproduce, grow and where they can live, according to four new studies published today in a special issue of Fisheries magazine.
Biology News - Evolution, Cell theory, Gene theory, Microbiology, Biotechnology, Fri, 01 Jul 2016 07:55:00 GMT

Climate change's effect on Rocky Mountain plant is driven by sex
For the valerian plant, higher elevations in the Colorado Rocky Mountains are becoming much more co-ed. And the primary reason appears to be climate change.
Biology News - Evolution, Cell theory, Gene theory, Microbiology, Biotechnology, Fri, 01 Jul 2016 07:55:00 GMT

Scientists discover maleness gene in malaria mosquitoes
Scientists, led by Dr Jaroslaw Krzywinski, Head of the Vector Molecular Biology group at The Pirbright Institute have isolated a gene, which determines maleness in the species of mosquito that is responsible for transmitting malaria. The research, published in the journal Science, describes identification and characterisation of a gene, named Yob by the authors, which is the master regulator of the sex determination process in the African malaria mosquito, Anopheles gambiae, and determines the male sex.
Biology News - Evolution, Cell theory, Gene theory, Microbiology, Biotechnology, Fri, 01 Jul 2016 07:55:00 GMT

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SciCentral picks

The top 5 resources
selected by our team
for biological science
news coverage:


EurekAlert!
rank:1
white line spacer BiologyNewsNet
rank:2
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Science Daily
rank:3
white line spacer The Scientist
rank:4
white line spacer BioSpace
rank:5
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