SciCentral Home
Gateway to the best
science news sources
spacer

About SciCentralup arrow

spacer
up arrow
spacer  Today's Research News: spacer
Biosciences
Health Sciences
Physics/Chemistry
Earth & Space
Engineering
spacer spacer   Tools & Resources: spacer
spacerarrow Literature Search spacer
spacerarrow Journals spacer
spacerarrow Databases spacer
spacerarrow Jobs spacer
spacerarrow Conferences spacer
spacerarrow Tools & Protocols
spacer
sky
metal balls
brainwaves
spacer spacer Smart guides to...
spacer
 eye lasik surgery

 bulb online education

 cell phone cell phones

spacerMore Guides...
spacer spacer spacer

Search Wikipedia
spacer
spacer
spacer
spacer

Editors' Picks:



spacer
Bioscience News
spacer
Today's biological science headlines from the sources selected by our team:

Scientists make new discovery about bird evolution
A team of scientists has described the most exceptionally preserved fossil bird discovered to date, in a newly published article. The new specimen from the rich Early Cretaceous Jehol Biota (approximately 131 to 120 million years old) is referred to as Eoconfuciusornis, the oldest and most primitive member of the Confuciusornithiformes, a group of early birds characterized by the first occurrence of an avian beak.
Plants & Animals News -- ScienceDaily, Sun, 26 Mar 2017 21:44:13 GMT

Biodiversity loss shifts flowering phenology at same magnitude as global warming
Researchers have revealed that declining plant diversity -- from habitat loss, human use, and other environmental pressures -- causes plants to flower earlier, and that the effects of diversity loss on the timing of flowering are similar in magnitude to the effects of global warming. The finding could have a powerful influence on the way scientists study ecosystem changes and measure the effects of global warming.
Plants & Animals News -- ScienceDaily, Sun, 26 Mar 2017 21:44:13 GMT

Amazingly fast, cheap genome sequencing: Zika virus mosquito genome assembled from scratch
A team of scientists has developed a new way to sequence genomes, which can assemble the genome of an organism, entirely from scratch, dramatically cheaper and faster.
Plants & Animals News -- ScienceDaily, Sun, 26 Mar 2017 21:44:13 GMT

Identifying genes key to human memory: Insights from genetics and cognitive neuroscience
(Cognitive Neuroscience Society) Researchers have identified more than 100 genes important for memory in people. The study, being presented at the CNS annual conference in San Francisco, is the first to identify correlations between gene data and brain activity during memory processing, providing a new window into human memory. It is part of the nascent but growing field of 'imaging genetics,' which aims to relate genetic variation to variation in brain anatomy and function.
EurekAlert! - Biology, Sun, 26 Mar 2017 21:44:14 GMT

UNC to create and test injectable long-acting implant to prevent HIV/AIDS
(University of North Carolina Health Care) Researchers at the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill have received a three-year, $1.8 million grant from the National Institutes of Health to develop a new implantable drug delivery system for long-lasting HIV-prevention.
EurekAlert! - Biology, Sun, 26 Mar 2017 21:44:14 GMT

Electrical 'switch' in brain's capillary network monitors activity and controls blood flow
(Larner College of Medicine at the University of Vermont) New research has uncovered that capillaries have the capacity to both sense brain activity and generate an electrical vasodilatory signal to evoke blood flow and direct nutrients to neurons.
EurekAlert! - Biology, Sun, 26 Mar 2017 21:44:14 GMT

The proteins that domesticated our genomes

EPFL scientists have carried out a genomic and evolutionary study of a large and enigmatic family of human proteins, to demonstrate that it is responsible for harnessing the millions of transposable elements in the human genome. The work reveals the largely species-specific gene-regulatory networks that impact all of human biology, in both health and disease.

Biology News Net, Sun, 26 Mar 2017 21:44:14 GMT

Human kidney progenitors isolated, offering new clues to cell renewal

In a first-of-its-kind look at human kidney development, researchers at The Saban Research Institute of Children's Hospital Los Angeles have isolated human nephron progenitor (NP) cells. Their results, published online in the journal Stem Cell Translational Medicine, will help scientists understand how these progenitor cells become renal cells in the developing fetus, and possibly offer a future way to foster renal regeneration after chronic kidney failure or acute injury.

Biology News Net, Sun, 26 Mar 2017 21:44:14 GMT

Study reveals how ionising radiation damages DNA and causes cancer

For the first time, researchers from the Wellcome Trust Sanger Institute and their collaborators have been able to identify in human cancers two characteristic patterns of DNA damage caused by ionising radiation. These fingerprint patterns may now enable doctors to identify which tumours have been caused by radiation, and investigate if they should be treated differently.

Biology News Net, Sun, 26 Mar 2017 21:44:14 GMT

International collaboration working to enhance protections for spinner dolphins
An international study involving researchers from Western Australia and the United States has unlocked a key behavioural schedule in spinner dolphins, which could provide crucial insight to conservation measures for the free-ranging animals.
Biology News - Evolution, Cell theory, Gene theory, Microbiology, Biotechnology, Fri, 13 Jan 2017 14:48:20 GMT

Video: Tracking data and shark behaviour
Animals often share space as they move through their environment. Capturing these aggregations and co-occurrence events has proven extremely difficult in elusive, wide-ranging animals.
Biology News - Evolution, Cell theory, Gene theory, Microbiology, Biotechnology, Fri, 13 Jan 2017 14:48:20 GMT

Tremors in newborn piglets attributed to previously unidentified virus
Symptoms of tremors and shaking in newborn piglets are not a sign that the animals are cold, but rather that they are suffering from a specific viral infection. Researchers at Vetmeduni Vienna have now been able to prove this correlation for the first time using a newly developed test. The scientists detected a previously unknown virus, termed atypical porcine pestivirus (APPV), in "shaking piglets", making it possible to clearly diagnose the potentially fatal disease. The virus remains in the animals for a long time following an infection and may also be transmitted sexually. The findings were published in the journal Veterinary Research.
Biology News - Evolution, Cell theory, Gene theory, Microbiology, Biotechnology, Fri, 13 Jan 2017 14:48:20 GMT

powered by zFeeder
spacer spacer
SciCentral picks

The top 5 resources
selected by our team
for biological science
news coverage:


EurekAlert!
rank:1
white line spacer BiologyNewsNet
rank:2
white line spacer
Science Daily
rank:3
white line spacer The Scientist
rank:4
white line spacer BioSpace
rank:5
white line spacer

spacer