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Editors' Picks:



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Bioscience News
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Today's biological science headlines from the sources selected by our team:

Drought may take toll on Congo rainforest, NASA satellites show
A new analysis of NASA satellite data shows Africa's Congo rainforest, the second-largest tropical rainforest in the world, has undergone a large-scale decline in greenness over the past decade. Scientists use the satellite-derived "greenness" of forest regions as one indicator of a forest's health. While this study looks specifically at the impact of a persistent drought in the Congo region since 2000, researchers say that a continued drying trend might alter the composition and structure of the Congo rainforest, affecting its biodiversity and carbon storage.
Plants & Animals News -- ScienceDaily, Thu, 24 Apr 2014 10:56:05 GMT

Rural microbes could boost city dwellers' health, study finds
The greater prevalence of asthma, allergies and other chronic inflammatory disorders among people of lower socioeconomic status might be due in part to their reduced exposure to the microbes that thrive in rural environments, according to a new scientific paper.
Plants & Animals News -- ScienceDaily, Thu, 24 Apr 2014 10:56:05 GMT

Male or female? First sex-determining genes appeared in mammals some 180 million years ago
The Y chromosome, which distinguishes males from females at the genetic level, appeared some 180 million years ago. It originated twice independently in all mammals. Scientists have managed to date these events that are crucial for both mammalian evolution and our lives, because the Y chromosome determines whether we are born as a boy or girl.
Plants & Animals News -- ScienceDaily, Thu, 24 Apr 2014 10:56:05 GMT

Bioethicists use theatrical narratives to bridge the gap between society and science
(Johns Hopkins Medicine) A new book from bioethicists at Johns Hopkins and Columbia universities uses dramatic narratives as an accessible gateway to the complex ethical issues of integrating genomics and health care.
EurekAlert! - Biology, Thu, 24 Apr 2014 10:56:05 GMT

NASA satellites show drought may take toll on Congo rainforest
(NASA/Goddard Space Flight Center) A new analysis of NASA satellite data shows Africa's Congo rainforest, the second-largest tropical rainforest in the world, has undergone a large-scale decline in greenness over the past decade.
EurekAlert! - Biology, Thu, 24 Apr 2014 10:56:05 GMT

Rural microbes could boost city dwellers' health
(University of Colorado at Boulder) The greater prevalence of asthma, allergies and other chronic inflammatory disorders among people of lower socioeconomic status might be due in part to their reduced exposure to the microbes that thrive in rural environments, according to a new scientific paper.
EurekAlert! - Biology, Thu, 24 Apr 2014 10:56:05 GMT

Scientists identify critical new protein complex involved in learning and memory

Scientists from the Florida campus of The Scripps Research Institute (TSRI) have identified a protein complex that plays a critical but previously unknown role in learning and memory formation.

Biology News Net, Thu, 24 Apr 2014 10:56:05 GMT

International team sequences rainbow trout genome

Using fish bred at Washington State University, an international team of researchers has mapped the genetic profile of the rainbow trout, a versatile salmonid whose relatively recent genetic history opens a window into how vertebrates evolve.

Biology News Net, Thu, 24 Apr 2014 10:56:05 GMT

Bioinformatics profiling identifies a new mammalian clock gene


Mice are nocturnal. When both wild type and Chrono knockout mice are kept in an environment with 12 hours of light (blue) and 12 hours of dark (white).They align their...
Over the last few decades researchers have characterized a set of clock genes that drive daily rhythms of physiology and behavior in all types of species, from flies to humans. Over 15 mammalian clock proteins have been identified, but researchers surmise there are more. A team from the Perelman School of Medicine at the University of Pennsylvania wondered if big-data approaches could find them.

Biology News Net, Thu, 24 Apr 2014 10:56:05 GMT

Nest-building in finches is a learning process developed through experience
(Phys.org) —Nest-building is not just an innate skill but a learning process that birds develop through experience, research suggests.
Phys.org: Biology News, Thu, 24 Apr 2014 10:56:05 GMT

Citizen scientists match research tool when counting sharks
Shark data collected by citizen scientists may be as reliable as data collected using automated tools, according to results published April 23, 2014, in the open access journal PLOS ONE by Gabriel Vianna from The University of Western Australia and colleagues.
Phys.org: Biology News, Thu, 24 Apr 2014 10:56:05 GMT

Microbes provide insights into evolution of human language
Big brains do not explain why only humans use sophisticated language, according to researchers who have discovered that even a species of pond life communicates by similar methods.
Phys.org: Biology News, Thu, 24 Apr 2014 10:56:05 GMT

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SciCentral picks

The top 5 resources
selected by our team
for biological science
news coverage:


EurekAlert!
rank:1
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Science Daily
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white line spacer The Scientist
rank:4
white line spacer BioSpace
rank:5
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