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Bioscience News
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Today's biological science headlines from the sources selected by our team:

Species abundance: Winter restricts innovation
Why are there so many more species in the tropics? The 'storage effect' is stronger there than in temperate forests.
Plants & Animals News -- ScienceDaily, Wed, 20 Sep 2017 18:01:58 GMT

Bite force research reveals dinosaur-eating frog
Scientists say that a large, now extinct, frog called Beelzebufo that lived about 68 million years ago in Madagascar would have been capable of eating small dinosaurs. The conclusion comes from a study of the bite force of South American horned frogs from the living genus Ceratophrys, known as Pacman frogs for their characteristic round shape and large mouth, similar to the video game character Pac-Man.
Plants & Animals News -- ScienceDaily, Wed, 20 Sep 2017 18:01:58 GMT

Imagining a world without species
Categorizing species can get hazy at small, microbial scales. After all, the classical definition of species as interbreeding individuals with sexually viable offspring doesn't apply to asexual organisms. Examining shared DNA doesn't help either: collectively, E. coli bacteria have only 20 percent of genes in common. In new research, a researcher asks: could organism interactions be described without mentioning species at all?
Plants & Animals News -- ScienceDaily, Wed, 20 Sep 2017 18:01:58 GMT

Dinosaur evolution: Lumbering giants had agile ancestors
(Ludwig-Maximilians-Universität München) The best known sauropod dinosaurs were huge herbivorous creatures, whose brain structures were markedly different from those of their evolutionary predecessors, for the earliest representatives of the group were small, lithe carnivores.
EurekAlert! - Biology, Wed, 20 Sep 2017 18:01:58 GMT

Animal acoustic activity decline shows forest fire pollution wreaks havoc on wildlife
(University of Kent) Forest fires in Southeast Asia during the El Niño droughts of 2015 caused considerable disruption to the biodiversity of the region due to the smoke-induced 'haze' they created, according to new research led by Benjamin Lee at the University of Kent and the National Parks Board in Singapore.
EurekAlert! - Biology, Wed, 20 Sep 2017 18:01:58 GMT

$2.375 million federal award to study epigenetic control systems, inform drug discovery
(Van Andel Research Institute) Van Andel Research Institute scientist Scott Rothbart, Ph.D., has been awarded a five-year, $2.375 million Maximizing Investigators' Research Award from the National Institute of General Medical Sciences of the National Institutes of Health that will fuel in-depth, multidisciplinary studies into the epigenetic control mechanisms that regulate the genetic code.
EurekAlert! - Biology, Wed, 20 Sep 2017 18:01:58 GMT

The proteins that domesticated our genomes

EPFL scientists have carried out a genomic and evolutionary study of a large and enigmatic family of human proteins, to demonstrate that it is responsible for harnessing the millions of transposable elements in the human genome. The work reveals the largely species-specific gene-regulatory networks that impact all of human biology, in both health and disease.

Biology News Net, Wed, 20 Sep 2017 18:01:58 GMT

Human kidney progenitors isolated, offering new clues to cell renewal

In a first-of-its-kind look at human kidney development, researchers at The Saban Research Institute of Children's Hospital Los Angeles have isolated human nephron progenitor (NP) cells. Their results, published online in the journal Stem Cell Translational Medicine, will help scientists understand how these progenitor cells become renal cells in the developing fetus, and possibly offer a future way to foster renal regeneration after chronic kidney failure or acute injury.

Biology News Net, Wed, 20 Sep 2017 18:01:58 GMT

Study reveals how ionising radiation damages DNA and causes cancer

For the first time, researchers from the Wellcome Trust Sanger Institute and their collaborators have been able to identify in human cancers two characteristic patterns of DNA damage caused by ionising radiation. These fingerprint patterns may now enable doctors to identify which tumours have been caused by radiation, and investigate if they should be treated differently.

Biology News Net, Wed, 20 Sep 2017 18:01:58 GMT

International collaboration working to enhance protections for spinner dolphins
An international study involving researchers from Western Australia and the United States has unlocked a key behavioural schedule in spinner dolphins, which could provide crucial insight to conservation measures for the free-ranging animals.
Biology News - Evolution, Cell theory, Gene theory, Microbiology, Biotechnology, Fri, 13 Jan 2017 14:48:20 GMT

Video: Tracking data and shark behaviour
Animals often share space as they move through their environment. Capturing these aggregations and co-occurrence events has proven extremely difficult in elusive, wide-ranging animals.
Biology News - Evolution, Cell theory, Gene theory, Microbiology, Biotechnology, Fri, 13 Jan 2017 14:48:20 GMT

Tremors in newborn piglets attributed to previously unidentified virus
Symptoms of tremors and shaking in newborn piglets are not a sign that the animals are cold, but rather that they are suffering from a specific viral infection. Researchers at Vetmeduni Vienna have now been able to prove this correlation for the first time using a newly developed test. The scientists detected a previously unknown virus, termed atypical porcine pestivirus (APPV), in "shaking piglets", making it possible to clearly diagnose the potentially fatal disease. The virus remains in the animals for a long time following an infection and may also be transmitted sexually. The findings were published in the journal Veterinary Research.
Biology News - Evolution, Cell theory, Gene theory, Microbiology, Biotechnology, Fri, 13 Jan 2017 14:48:20 GMT

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SciCentral picks

The top 5 resources
selected by our team
for biological science
news coverage:


EurekAlert!
rank:1
white line spacer BiologyNewsNet
rank:2
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Science Daily
rank:3
white line spacer The Scientist
rank:4
white line spacer BioSpace
rank:5
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