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Bioscience News
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Today's biological science headlines from the sources selected by our team:

Saving north america's salamanders, newts
The fate of the world’s richest biodiversity of salamanders and newts is in the hands of pet owners across North America, warns a researcher, due to the threat of salamander chytrid disease that infects both salamanders and newts with near total lethality.
Plants & Animals News -- ScienceDaily, Mon, 30 May 2016 14:31:41 GMT

Hydrogen synthesis: When enzymes assemble themselves in the test tube
Researchers have engineered a hydrogen-producing enzyme in the test tube that works as efficiently as the original. The protein – a so-called hydrogenase from green algae – is made up of a protein scaffold and a cofactor. The latter is the reaction center where the substances that react with each other dock. When the researchers added various chemically synthesized substances to the protein scaffold, the cofactor spontaneously assembled.
Plants & Animals News -- ScienceDaily, Mon, 30 May 2016 14:31:41 GMT

International law allows for the legalization of cannabis
The regulated cultivation and trade of cannabis for recreational use is permissible on the basis of states’ positive human rights obligations. Pleas for the regulated cultivation and trade of recreational cannabis are often based on arguments related to individual and public health, the safety of citizens and the fight against crime: the so-called positive human rights obligations. To date, however, no study has been carried out to find out what the legal implications of legalizing cannabis would be.
Plants & Animals News -- ScienceDaily, Mon, 30 May 2016 14:31:41 GMT

Alaska scientist receives $1.6 million award for vaccine research
(University of Alaska Fairbanks) A treatment credited with saving about nine million lives a year worldwide and bringing major human diseases including smallpox, tetanus, whooping cough and polio under some degree of control is said to have begun with a milkmaid, a boy, a cow and a doctor about two hundred years ago.Yet in all that time, the details of how the treatment actually works are still unclear. Dr. Andrea Ferrante, a University of Alaska Fairbanks scientist, hopes to change that.
EurekAlert! - Biology, Mon, 30 May 2016 14:31:41 GMT

Fish courtship pheromone uses the brain's smell pathway
(RIKEN) Research at the RIKEN Brain Science Institute in Japan has revealed that a molecule involved in fish reproduction activates the brain via the nose. The pheromone is released by female zebrafish and sensed by smell receptors in the noses of the males. The neural pathway and brain areas involved in transforming this molecular messenger into courtship behavior in fish were also identified and reported in Nature Neuroscience on May 30.
EurekAlert! - Biology, Mon, 30 May 2016 14:31:41 GMT

The brain clock that keeps memories ticking
(RIKEN) Neurons in the brain need well-timed waves of activity to organize memories across time. In the hippocampus, temporal ordering of the neural code is important for building a mental map of where you've been, where you are, and where you are going. Research from the RIKEN Brain Science Institute in Japan has pinpointed how the neurons that represent space in mice stay in time.
EurekAlert! - Biology, Mon, 30 May 2016 14:31:41 GMT

Scientists capture the elusive structure of essential digestive enzyme


Stylized graphic of SEC-SAXS data (with cyan cross-section showing the elution profile and magenta cross-section showing scattering profile) and the structure of the activated phenylalanine hydroxylase
Using a powerful combination of techniques from biophysics to mathematics, researchers have revealed new insights into the mechanism of a liver enzyme that is critical for human health. The enzyme, phenylalanine hydroxylase, turns the essential amino acid phenylalanine -- found in eggs, beef and many other foods and as an additive in diet soda -- into tyrosine, a precursor for multiple important neurotransmitters.

Biology News Net, Mon, 30 May 2016 14:31:41 GMT

Neuroscientists illuminate role of autism-linked gene

A new study from MIT neuroscientists reveals that a gene mutation associated with autism plays a critical role in the formation and maturation of synapses -- the connections that allow neurons to communicate with each other.

Biology News Net, Mon, 30 May 2016 14:31:41 GMT

Genome 10K -- Vertebrate 'genomic zoo' to help protect our planet


This image shows a range of vertebrate the G10K members are working on: Bird - Ruby-throated Hummingbird; Reptile - Green Anole; Fish - Spotted Gar; Mammal - Koala
The Genome Analysis Centre (TGAC) are to hold the biannual Genome 10K Conference on 29 August - 1 September 2017.

Biology News Net, Mon, 30 May 2016 14:31:41 GMT

Poachers in Zimbabwe use cyanide to kill five elephants
Zimbabwean officials say poachers killed five elephants by poisoning them with cyanide.
Biology News - Evolution, Cell theory, Gene theory, Microbiology, Biotechnology, Mon, 30 May 2016 14:31:41 GMT

Shark alert! Warnings high- and low-tech seek to protect
From drones and smartphone apps to old-school flags and signs, a growing great white shark population along the East Coast has officials and researchers turning to responses both high- and low-tech to ensure safety for millions of beachgoers this summer.
Biology News - Evolution, Cell theory, Gene theory, Microbiology, Biotechnology, Mon, 30 May 2016 14:31:41 GMT

Do female birds mate with multiple males to protect their young?
Blue tit females mate with more than one male. Several possible blue tit fathers may then work together to stop predators from attacking their young, according to new research from the University of Bergen. Philosopher Claus Halberg believes this research challenges established ideas about the passive female.
Biology News - Evolution, Cell theory, Gene theory, Microbiology, Biotechnology, Mon, 30 May 2016 14:31:41 GMT

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SciCentral picks

The top 5 resources
selected by our team
for biological science
news coverage:


EurekAlert!
rank:1
white line spacer BiologyNewsNet
rank:2
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Science Daily
rank:3
white line spacer The Scientist
rank:4
white line spacer BioSpace
rank:5
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