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Editors' Picks:


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Health Science News
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Today's health science headlines from the sources selected by our team:

Researchers show value of tissue-engineering to repair major peripheral nerve injuries
Peripheral nerve injury (PNI) is a common consequence of traumatic injuries, wounds caused by an external force or an act of violence, such as a car accident, gun shot or even surgery. In those injuries that require surgical reconstruction, outcomes can result in partial or complete loss of nerve function and a reduced quality of life. But, researchers at Penn Medicine have demonstrated a novel way to regenerate long-distance nerve connections in animal models using tissue-engineered nerve grafts (TENGs). Their work was presented earlier this month at the annual meeting of the American Society for Peripheral Nerve (ASPN) at the Atlantis Resort, Paradise Island, Bahamas.
Medical Xpress - spotlight medical and health news stories, Mon, 02 Feb 2015 01:14:50 GMT

Researchers reveal how pancreatic cancer cells sidestep chemotherapy
Pancreatic cancer is one of the deadliest forms of the disease. The American Cancer Society's most recent estimates for 2014 show that over 46,000 people will be diagnosed with pancreatic cancer and more than 39,000 will die from it. Now, research led by Timothy J. Yen, PhD, Professor at Fox Chase Cancer Center, reveals that one reason this deadly form of cancer can be so challenging to treat is because its cells have found a way to sidestep chemotherapy. They hijack the vitamin D receptor, normally associated with bone health, and re-purposed it to repair the damage caused by chemotherapy. The findings, which will be published in the January 3 issue of the journal Cell Cycle, raise hopes that doctors will one day find a way to turn this process against the tumor and help chemotherapy do its job.
Medical Xpress - spotlight medical and health news stories, Mon, 02 Feb 2015 01:14:50 GMT

Latent HIV may lurk in 'quiet' immune cells, research suggests
Drugs for HIV have become adept at suppressing infection, but they still can't eliminate it. That's because the medication in these pills doesn't touch the virus' hidden reserves, which lie dormant within infected white blood cells. Unlock the secrets of this pool of latent virus, scientists believe, and it may become possible to cure - not just control - HIV.
Medical Xpress - spotlight medical and health news stories, Mon, 02 Feb 2015 01:14:50 GMT

Latent HIV may lurk in 'quiet' immune cells, research suggests
HIV can lie dormant in infected cells for years, even decades. Scientists think unlocking the secrets of this viral reservoir may make it possible to cure, not just treat, HIV. Researchers have gained new insight on which immune cells likely do, and do not, harbor this latent virus.
Health & Medicine News -- ScienceDaily, Mon, 02 Feb 2015 01:24:47 GMT

Stress shared by same-sex couples can have unique health impacts
Minority stress -- which results from being stigmatized and disadvantaged in society -- affects same-sex couples' stress levels and overall health, research indicates. Authors of a new study state that the health effects of minority stress shared by a couple can be understood as distinct from individual stress, a new framework in the field.
Health & Medicine News -- ScienceDaily, Mon, 02 Feb 2015 01:24:47 GMT

Research uncovers connection between Craigslist personals, HIV trends
Craigslist's entry into a market results in a 15.9 percent increase in reported HIV cases, according to research. When mapped at the national level, more than 6,000 HIV cases annually and treatment costs estimated between $62 million and $65.3 million can be linked to the popular website, the authors state.
Health & Medicine News -- ScienceDaily, Mon, 02 Feb 2015 01:24:47 GMT

Little Improvement in Children Paralyzed After Viral Infection, Study Finds
Title: Little Improvement in Children Paralyzed After Viral Infection, Study Finds
Category: Health News
Created: 1/29/2015 12:00:00 AM
Last Editorial Review: 1/30/2015 12:00:00 AM
MedicineNet Daily News, Mon, 02 Feb 2015 01:24:47 GMT

Diabetes Patients Lax With Meds If Diagnosed With Cancer, Study Finds
Title: Diabetes Patients Lax With Meds If Diagnosed With Cancer, Study Finds
Category: Health News
Created: 1/29/2015 12:00:00 AM
Last Editorial Review: 1/30/2015 12:00:00 AM
MedicineNet Daily News, Mon, 02 Feb 2015 01:24:47 GMT

Flu's Grip on U.S. Starting to Weaken: CDC
Title: Flu's Grip on U.S. Starting to Weaken: CDC
Category: Health News
Created: 1/29/2015 12:00:00 AM
Last Editorial Review: 1/30/2015 12:00:00 AM
MedicineNet Daily News, Mon, 02 Feb 2015 01:24:47 GMT

Improving health before pregnancy could be key to the prevention of childhood obesity
(University of Southampton) A new study from the University of Southampton adds to a growing body of evidence that links a child's early environment before and soon after birth to their chance of becoming obese later in life.
EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health, Mon, 02 Feb 2015 01:24:47 GMT

Arsenic stubbornly taints many US wells, say new reports
(The Earth Institute at Columbia University) Naturally occurring arsenic in private wells threatens people in many US states and parts of Canada, according to a package of a dozen scientific papers to be published next week. The studies, focused mainly on New England but applicable elsewhere, say private wells present continuing risks due to almost nonexistent regulation in most states, homeowner inaction and inadequate mitigation measures.
EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health, Mon, 02 Feb 2015 01:24:47 GMT

Moffitt study find loss of certain protein is associated with poor prognosis in breast, lung cancer
(H. Lee Moffitt Cancer Center & Research Institute) Moffitt Cancer Center researchers have found that breast and lung cancer patients who have low levels of a protein called tristetraprolin have more aggressive tumors and a poorer prognosis than those with high levels of the protein. Their study was published in the Dec. 26 issue of PLoS One.
EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health, Mon, 02 Feb 2015 01:24:47 GMT

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SciCentral picks

The top 5 resources
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for health science
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Medical Xpress
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white line spacer Medical News Today
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white line spacer Medline Plus
rank:3
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EurekAlert!
rank:3
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rank:5
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