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Editors' Picks:


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Health Science News
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Today's health science headlines from the sources selected by our team:

Thyroid cancer genome analysis finds markers of aggressive tumors
A new comprehensive analysis of thyroid cancer from The Cancer Genome Atlas Research Network has identified markers of aggressive tumors, which could allow for better targeting of appropriate treatments to individual patients.
Medical Xpress - spotlight medical and health news stories, Thu, 23 Oct 2014 17:12:01 GMT

Gene that once aided survival in the Arctic found to have negative impact on health today
In individuals living in the Arctic, researchers have discovered a genetic variant that arose thousands of years ago and most likely provided an evolutionary advantage for processing high-fat diets or for surviving in a cold environment; however, the variant also seems to increase the risk of hypoglycemia, or low blood sugar, and infant mortality in today's northern populations. The findings, published online October 23 in Cell Press's American Journal of Human Genetics, provide an example of how an initially beneficial genetic change could be detrimental to future generations.
Medical Xpress - spotlight medical and health news stories, Thu, 23 Oct 2014 17:12:01 GMT

New insight on why people with Down syndrome invariably develop Alzheimer's disease
A new study by researchers at Sanford-Burnham Medical Research Institute reveals the process that leads to changes in the brains of individuals with Down syndrome—the same changes that cause dementia in Alzheimer's patients. The findings, published in Cell Reports, have important implications for the development of treatments that can prevent damage in neuronal connectivity and brain function in Down syndrome and other neurodevelopmental and neurodegenerative conditions, including Alzheimer's disease.
Medical Xpress - spotlight medical and health news stories, Thu, 23 Oct 2014 17:12:01 GMT

Teen Sisters Develop Ways to Measure Lung, Heart Damage
Title: Teen Sisters Develop Ways to Measure Lung, Heart Damage
Category: Health News
Created: 10/21/2014 12:00:00 AM
Last Editorial Review: 10/22/2014 12:00:00 AM
MedicineNet Daily News, Thu, 23 Oct 2014 17:06:45 GMT

Tire Company Sets Standard for Ebola Care in Liberia: CDC
Title: Tire Company Sets Standard for Ebola Care in Liberia: CDC
Category: Health News
Created: 10/21/2014 12:00:00 AM
Last Editorial Review: 10/22/2014 12:00:00 AM
MedicineNet Daily News, Thu, 23 Oct 2014 17:06:45 GMT

Use Chia Seeds With Caution, Researcher Warns
Title: Use Chia Seeds With Caution, Researcher Warns
Category: Health News
Created: 10/21/2014 12:00:00 AM
Last Editorial Review: 10/22/2014 12:00:00 AM
MedicineNet Daily News, Thu, 23 Oct 2014 17:06:45 GMT

Finally: Missing link between vitamin D, prostate cancer
A new study offers compelling evidence that inflammation may be the link between vitamin D and prostate cancer. Specifically, the study shows that the gene GDF-15, known to be upregulated by vitamin D, is notably absent in samples of human prostate cancer driven by inflammation.
Health & Medicine News -- ScienceDaily, Thu, 23 Oct 2014 17:06:45 GMT

Real-time tracking system developed to monitor dangerous bacteria inside body
Combining a PET scanner with a new chemical tracer that selectively tags specific types of bacteria, researchers working with mice report they have devised a way to detect and monitor in real time infections with dangerous Gram-negative bacteria. These increasingly drug-resistant bacteria are responsible for a range of diseases, including fatal pneumonias and various bloodstream or solid-organ infections acquired in and outside the hospital.
Health & Medicine News -- ScienceDaily, Thu, 23 Oct 2014 17:06:45 GMT

Paralyzed patients have weaker bones, higher risk of fractures than expected
People paralyzed by spinal cord injuries lose mechanical strength in their leg bones faster, and more significantly, than previously believed, putting them at greater risk for fractures from minor stresses, according to a study by researchers. The results suggest that physicians should begin therapies for such patients sooner to maintain bone mass and strength, and should think beyond standard bone density tests when assessing fracture risk in osteoporosis patients.
Health & Medicine News -- ScienceDaily, Thu, 23 Oct 2014 17:06:45 GMT

Experimental breast cancer drug holds promise in combination therapy for Ewing sarcoma
(St. Jude Children's Research Hospital) Ewing sarcoma tumors disappeared and did not return in more than 70 percent of mice treated with combination therapy that included drugs from a family of experimental agents developed to fight breast cancer, reported St. Jude Children's Research Hospital scientists.
EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health, Thu, 23 Oct 2014 17:06:45 GMT

Study finds significant increase in type 1 diabetes rates among non-Hispanic white youth
(Kaiser Permanente) The rate of non-Hispanic white youth diagnosed with type 1 diabetes increased significantly from 2002 to 2009 in all but the youngest age group of children, according to a new study published today in the journal Diabetes.
EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health, Thu, 23 Oct 2014 17:06:45 GMT

TCGA study improves understanding of genetic drivers of thyroid cancer
(NIH/National Human Genome Research Institute) An analysis of the genomes of nearly 500 papillary thyroid carcinomas -- the most common form of thyroid cancer -- provided new insights into the roles of frequently mutated cancer genes and other alterations driving disease development. The findings also may help improve diagnosis and treatment. Investigators with The Cancer Genome Atlas project identified new molecular subtypes that will help clinicians determine which tumors are more aggressive and which are more likely to respond to certain treatments.
EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health, Thu, 23 Oct 2014 17:06:45 GMT

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SciCentral picks

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Medical Xpress
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EurekAlert!
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