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Today's Highlights
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Today's news headlines from the sources selected by our team:

The Science of Weight Loss
Want to lose weight? Live Science can help.
Live Science, Wed, 25 May 2016 01:04:18 GMT

Alien Life? Radiation May Erase Mars, Europa Fossils
Radiation from beyond the solar system may destroy any organic fossils lying on the surface of Mars or Jupiter's icy moon Europa.
Live Science, Wed, 25 May 2016 01:04:18 GMT

Do Trees Sleep at Night?
After a long a long day of photosynthesizing, do trees fall asleep? It depends on how you define "sleep," but trees do relax their branches at night, which might be a sign of sleep, a new study finds.
Live Science, Wed, 25 May 2016 01:04:18 GMT

Exxon 'has to change or die' on climate
The world's biggest publicly traded oil company faces a critical AGM under pressure from a broad coalition of shareholders on climate change.
BBC News - Science & Environment, Wed, 25 May 2016 01:04:18 GMT

Evolutionary engineer wins tech prize
US biochemical engineer Frances Arnold takes the million-euro Millennium Technology Prize for pioneering 'directed evolution'.
BBC News - Science & Environment, Wed, 25 May 2016 01:04:18 GMT

Yellowstone in 1871 and today
Stunning photos of Yellowstone beauty spots in 1871 and today
BBC News - Science & Environment, Wed, 25 May 2016 01:04:18 GMT

New study of high-risk teens reveals a biological pathway for depression
A long line of research links poverty and depression. Now, a study by Duke University scientists shows how biology might underlie the depression experienced by high-risk adolescents whose families are socio-economically disadvantaged.
Medical Xpress - latest medical and health news stories, Wed, 25 May 2016 01:04:18 GMT

New study surveys genetic changes linked with Parkinson's disease
After Alzheimer's, Parkinson's disease (PD) is the leading neurodegenerative disorder, affecting close to a million Americans, with 50,000 new cases diagnosed every year. A progressive disorder of the nervous system affecting movement, PD typically strikes adults in mid-life. In many cases, the spread of the disease to other brain areas leads to Parkinson's disease dementia, characterized by deterioration of memory, reason, attention and planning.
Medical Xpress - latest medical and health news stories, Wed, 25 May 2016 01:04:18 GMT

Genetic variants isolated that lead to enhanced PD-L1 protein production in cancer cells
(Medical Xpress)—A large team of researchers from a host of research facilities across Japan has found some genetic variants in some cancer cells that lead to enhanced PD-L1 protein production—which results in increased protection against attacks by the immune system. In their paper published in the journal Nature, the team describes their sequencing study involving adult T-cell leukemia/lymphoma cases, what they found and the possibility that such variants could be used as identifying markers in cancer patients.
Medical Xpress - latest medical and health news stories, Wed, 25 May 2016 01:04:18 GMT

High performance golf club comes with annoying sound
In 2007, a new golf club hit the market. The distribution of mass in the club head made it less likely to twist, making an off-center hit less likely, but it had a drawback: a loud noise when it struck the ball, piercing through the tranquility of a golf course. The club never grew popular among players, with many saying they disliked the noise. Researchers set out to find the cause of the offensive clang.
Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily, Wed, 25 May 2016 01:04:18 GMT

Mucus may play vital role in dolphin echolocation
A dolphin chasing a tasty fish will produce a stream of rapid-fire echolocation clicks that help it track the speed, direction and distance to its prey. Now researchers have developed a model that could yield new insights into how the charismatic marine mammals make these clicks - and it turns out mucus may play an important role.
Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily, Wed, 25 May 2016 01:04:18 GMT

Single-step hydrogen peroxide production could be cleaner, more efficient
Chemical and biological engineers have uncovered new insight into how the compound hydrogen peroxide decomposes. This advance could inform efficient and cost-effective single-step strategies for producing hydrogen peroxide.
Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily, Wed, 25 May 2016 01:04:18 GMT

A Warning System for Tsunamis
Scientists at the Australian National University have developed the Time Reverse Imaging Method to take real-time data from the ocean sensors and use that information to recreate what the tsunami looked like when it was born. Once scientists have the tsunami source pinpointed, they can use it to make better predictions about what will happen once the waves reach shore. This new method is fast enough to compete with existing algorithms but much more accurate.
Newswise: Latest News, Wed, 25 May 2016 01:04:18 GMT

Physician Anesthesiologists, Veterans and VA Anesthesia Chiefs Oppose VA Policy Replacing Physicians with Nurses for Anesthesia Care in Surgery
The American Society of Anesthesiologists (ASA) urges Americans to protect our nation's Veterans by opposing a U.S. Department of Veterans Affairs (VA) proposed policy that removes physician anesthesiologists from surgery and replaces them with nurses, lowering the standard of care and jeopardizing Veterans' lives.
Newswise: Latest News, Wed, 25 May 2016 01:04:18 GMT

Grill with Caution: Wire Bristles from Barbecue Brushes Can Cause Serious Injuries
Newswise imageWhile many people view Memorial Day weekend as the unofficial start of the summer grilling season, they may not be aware of the dangers of eating food cooked on grills cleaned with wire-bristle brushes. A new study conducted at the University of Missouri School of Medicine identified more than 1,600 injuries from wire-bristle grill brushes reported in emergency rooms since 2002. Loose bristles can fall off the brush during cleaning and end up in the grilled food, which, if consumed, can lead to injuries in the mouth, throat and tonsils. Researchers advise individuals to inspect their food carefully after grilling or consider alternative grill-cleaning methods.
Newswise: Latest News, Wed, 25 May 2016 01:04:18 GMT

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